New Hampshire makes life harder for military recruiters

The state of New Hampshire has just passed a law that bars schools from handing over “test results, detailed demographic information, and social security numbers to military recruiting services without the consent of parents,” according to the National Coalition to Protect Student Privacy (NCPSP).

The bill, sponsored by a bipartisan group of lawmakers, was signed into law on July 14 by Democratic Governor Maggie Hassan. Specifically, it bars schools from handing over data to recruiters obtained through the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) exam, which is ostensibly a vocational test administered by the Department of Defense. However, New  Hampshire schools are still required by the No Child Left Behind law to hand over so-called “directory information” to military recruiters — names, addresses and phone numbers — unless parents explicitly object (and even then, there’s still no guarantee their child’s information isn’t being stored in a Pentagon database).

The victory, albeit small, comes after a similar bill was defeated earlier this year by Democrats in Connecticut, which I wrote about for Rupert Murdoch. The difference this time, according NCPSP director Pat Elder, was that the lobbying campaign was much more low-key.

“We didn’t mention it publicly,” Elder told me, which meant opponents “were caught off guard.” New Hampshire is the third state to enact such legislation, joining Maryland and Hawaii.

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About Charles Davis

A writer and producer with whose work has aired on television and radio and been published by outlets such as Al Jazeera, The Intercept, The Nation and The New Republic.
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